Open your mind and dump your ego

by: Adam Moore
Wednesday, July 19, 2017


Once you get into fitness for a while you'll start to notice that you enjoy a certain style of training. You'll then start to notice you get a bit protective over said method of training. It has worked for you so therefore it has to be the best right? If it works for you then it can work for everyone right? If you truly want to reach your goals in fitness, athletic performance, strength or aesthetics then you need to "open your mind and dump your ego."

Lets take a look at the main stream methodologies of training, what they do and how you can incorporate them to help you reach your goals faster. Lets start with my favorite, powerfliting.

Powerlifting of course consists of three of the main barbell movements; bench press, squat and the almighty deadlift. These three movements test your overall strength incorporating every muscle group in the body while utilitzing an enormous amount of core strength and endurance. For example, in all of the bodybuilding shows I competed in, I rarely ever "trained abs" because of the amount of work my abdominal wall would get during the powerlifting movements. Training the powerlifting movements can develop round, fully muscle bellies (the main rule of the aesthetic shape) while developing an amazing core and burning TONS of body fat.

Bodybuilding training is the most common method of training and is the most often used. Bodybuilding training or training for aesthetics is your basic 3-4 sets, 10-12 reps, etc and finish with a walk on the treadmill. This is an extremely effective method of "getting in shape" because it gives the ability to isolate and develop each individual muscle group. If the athlete has a good, objective eye for their own physique, the bodybuilding style training can develop a strong, aesthetic physique. The downfall of the bodybuilding style is the athlete does not assume much functionality and can develop a beautiful yet, "useless" physique if used exclusively.

Strongman training would probably be considered the most "outside the box" style but in the end, is the most "real life" and the most functional. Strongman training consists of heavy, powerful movements incorporating the entire body in a very functional manner. Strongman includes, strength, speed AND endurance and will burn the most calories and fat of any other method of training.

Crossfit training is the newest member of this club and it is based around life functional movements that test speed, endurance and functionality. Crossfit athletes tend to be the smallest of this elite crew but are strong and incredibly "useful". Crossfit workouts are not for the faint of cardio.

Olympic Lifting consists of the Snatch and Clean & Jerk which test strength and speed. Olympic lifting is extremely useful in sports training because of the increase in strength and speed through the hips therefore increasing performance in sports such as baseball, softball, tennis, golf, football, hockey and even ping pong. Olympic lifting, though sort of a lost art, is one of the most important things you can do in your training. Learn it, learn it correctly and use it to your advantage.

Now that we have quickly reviewed the main training methodologies, my goal is to open your eyes into incorporating all of these styles into your training. Even if your goal is to be Mr. Olympia on a bodybuilding stage, Crossfit should be part of your weekly programming. You will work balancing muscles and core which will help you bring a full, 3D physique to your stage. If your goal is powerlifting, bodybuilding training can be extremely helpful in training the ancillary muscles which will greatly increase your 1RM on the core lifts. These examples can go on and on. Each training methodology should be included in programming to develop your fitness goals to their maximum potential.
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